63 Popular Supermarket Fruits and Vegetables in the USA

Hi! I'm Max!

Hi! It's Max!
Would you like to learn the names of U.S. fruits and vegetables with me? Great!

Let's learn their names, and then we will play some games together!

Vegetables

Garlic
Asparagus
Carrot
Zucchini
Eggplant
Pumpkin
Onion
Radish
Lettuce
Cauliflower
Tomato

Daikon
Corn
Broccoli
Artichoke
Cabbage: Green cabbage
Peas
Cucumber
Peppers:
Bell pepper and
Chili pepper

Spinach
Brussel sprout/ Brussels sprout
Beans: These beans are called "green beans."
Kohlrabi

Chinese cabbage
Bok choy
Red cabbage
Savoy cabbage
Squash

Potato
Leek
Celery
Yam

Red bell pepper
Yellow bell pepper
Green bell pepper

Fruits

Cherry
Strawberry
Kiwi
Lemon
Banana
Watermelon

Blueberry
Raspberry
Orange
Grapefruit
Melon

Apple
Pear
Plum
Peach

Apricot
Grapes: Green and
Red grapes
Tangerine

Papaya
Cantaloupe
Pineapple
Avocado

Mango
Olive
Honeydew
Blackberry

Great job!

Now let's play some games together!

Guess the name of the fruit or vegetable. Click the blue circles to see if you are right!

Are you ready? Let's go!

How did you do?

Are you ready for a challenge?

Guess the names of these fruits below!

Note: One of the fruits below was not in the photos above,
so it is a super challenge!

You are amazing!

So you know the name of a fruit or vegetable from its picture.

But if you want to say you have one vegetable or two vegetables,
what do you say?

Let's learn about singular and plural nouns to help you!

What is a noun?​​

A noun is a word that names a person, a place, thing, or idea.

Fruits and vegetables are nouns because they are things.

What is a singular noun?

It is when you have one of a person, place, thing, or idea.

Now let's learn about singular nouns for fruits and vegetables!

Example: I have a watermelon. Watermelon is a singular noun because there is only one watermelon.

What is a plural noun?

It is when you have two or more of a person, place, thing, or idea.

For example, if I have a watermelon and add another watermelon, I have two watermelons. The plural form of watermelon is "watermelons."

Let's practice!

Let's practice what we are learning!


Click on the box to see if you are right!

Fantastic!

Let's learn one more thing to help us!

Some plural nouns of fruits and vegetables are countable.
Others are uncountable.

What is a countable noun?

A countable noun is a noun that can be counted- such as one, two, three, four watermelons. Watermelon is a countable noun because you can place a number in front of it.

Other examples of countable nouns are the words: orange, apple, lemon, and carrot.

Example #1: I grew three watermelons in my garden.

Example #2: Did you know my dad ate two watermelons last week?

You can use the phrase "how many" when you have countable nouns, but not "how much."

Example #1: How many watermelons did you eat last week?

Example #2: How many watermelons did you grow in your garden?

Countable nouns can be singular or plural.

Singular: watermelon.
Plural: watermelons.

What is an uncountable noun?

An uncountable noun is a noun you can't count in English- you can't place a number in front of it.

Some fruits and vegetables that are uncountable nouns: asparagus, corn, broccoli, bok choy, and lettuce.

Example #1: Bad: I grew five corns.
Good: I grew corn.

Example #2: Bad: I ate five broccoli last night.
Good: I ate broccoli last night.

Some of these words may be countable in a language other than English. For example, words like "luggage," "milk," and "water" are uncountable in English. But in another language, maybe you can count them.

I have confidence in you! You can learn this!

You can use the phrase "how much" when you have uncountable nouns, but not "how many."

Example #1: How much bok choy did you eat last night?

Example #2: How much corn did you grow?

There is no plural form for uncountable nouns. Remember the singular form and use it for both singular and plural nouns.

Example #1: There is no plural form for corn. Use the singular form: corn.

Good: I grow corn.
Bad: I grow corns.

Here is a tip to help you!
Some uncountable nouns have other words that can be used. Instead of saying "broccoli," you can say "heads of broccoli." "Heads of broccoli" is a countable noun. A countable noun may be easier to use.

What is a head of broccoli?

It is the whole vegetable.

Here are other vegetables with the word "head": head(s) of cauliflower, head(s) of lettuce, head(s) of cabbage, head(s) of Chinese cabbage, head(s) of Savoy cabbage, and head(s) of green cabbage.

They also mean the whole vegetable.

Example #1: I ate two heads of broccoli last night.

Example: #2: I bought a head of lettuce at the store.

The words "broccoli," "cauliflower," and "lettuce" are uncountable nouns. The words "cabbage," "Chinese cabbage," "Savoy cabbage," and "green cabbage" are countable nouns.

test
Let's practice!

Let's practice these new words!


Click on the box to see if you are right!

Now let's learn the plural names of other fruits and vegetables!

Then we will do a fun quiz!

See our article here if you want to learn: What is a fruit and what is a vegetable?

Plural Names of Fruits

Singular - One Fruit

Plural - Two Fruits

An apple – apples

*An apple and other larger fruits are cut into slices. The middle of an apple is called the “apple core.”

An apricot- apricots

*The hard seed inside an apricot is called a “pit” or “stone.” Inside the pit or stone is the true seed of the apricot.

An avocado – avocados

*The hard seed inside an avocado is called a “pit” in the United States. Inside the pit is the true seed of the avocado.

A banana – bananas

*A “bunch of bananas” is several bananas connected together. The outside layer of a banana is called a “banana peel.”

A blackberry – blackberries

*Blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are fruits that Americans call berries.

A blueberry – blueberries

*Blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are fruits that Americans call berries.

A cantaloupe – cantaloupes

*The “rind” is the thick outside layer of a cantaloupe.

  Cantaloupes, honeydews, and watermelons are some types of melons.

A cherry – cherries

*The hard seed inside a cherry is called a “pit” in the United States.  Inside the pit is the true seed of the cherry.

A grape – grapes

A “bunch of grapes” is many grapes connected together. Inside some types of grapes are seeds. Green, purple, and red grapes are common in the United States. Grapes grow on vines.

Winemakers use fermented grapes to make wine. California, Washington, and Oregon are the largest producers (makers) of wine in the United States.

A grapefruit – grapefruit/ grapefruits

*Grapefruit is both an uncountable and countable noun. The most common plural noun for grapefruit is the uncountable noun “grapefruit” in the United States.

The inside of a grapefruit is divided into “segments.” A grapefruit is a type of citrus fruit.

A honeydew (melon) – honeydews/ honeydew melons

*Both “honeydew” and “honeydew melon” are used in the United States. Cantaloupes, honeydews, and watermelons are some types of melons.

The “rind” is the thick outside layer of a honeydew.

A kiwi/ kiwifruit – kiwis/ kiwifruit

*The word “kiwifruit” is also commonly used for both singular and plural nouns.

A lemon – lemons

*“Lemon peel” is the outside layer of a lemon. “The zest of a lemon” is using the lemon peel to add flavor to food. The inside of a lemon is divided into “segments.” A lemon is a type of citrus fruit.

A lime – limes

*“Lime peel” is the outside layer of a lime. “The zest of a lime” is using the lime peel to add flavor to food. The inside of a lime is divided into “segments.” A lime is a type of citrus fruit.

A mango – mangoes/ mangos

*The word “mangoes” is the most common plural noun of mango in the United States. *The hard seed inside a mango is called a “pit” or “stone” in the United States. Inside the pit or stone is the true seed of the mango.

A melon – melons

The “rind” is the thick outside layer of a melon. Cantaloupes, honeydews, and watermelons are some types of melons.

An olive – olives

*Some olives have seeds inside, and others do not. The hard seed inside some olives is called a “pit” in the United States. Inside the pit is the true seed of the olive.

An orange – oranges

*The outside layer of a orange is called an “orange peel.” The inside of an orange is divided into “segments.” An orange is a type of citrus fruit.

A papaya – papayas

*The skin of the papaya is usually not eaten because it tastes bitter. The seeds of the papaya taste like black peppercorns.

A peach – peaches

*The hard seed inside a peach is called a “pit” or “stone” in the United States. Inside the pit or stone is the true seed of the peach.

A pear – pears

*The middle of a pear is called the “pear core.”

A pineapple – pineapples

*The middle of a pineapple is called the “pineapple core.”

A popular way Americans eat pineapple is in the shape of “pineapple rings,” or pineapple on pizza.

Hawaii was a large producer (maker) of pineapples in the 1900s in the United States. Americans still think of pineapples when they think of Hawaii. The largest producers of pineapples now are Costa Rica, Brazil, and the Philippines. 

A plum – plums

*The hard seed inside a plum is called a “pit” or “stone” in the United States. Inside the pit or stone is the true seed of the plum.

A raspberry – raspberries

*Blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are fruits that Americans call berries.

A red grape – red grapes

A “bunch of grapes” is many grapes connected together. Inside some types of grapes are seeds.  Grapes grow on vines.

Green, purple, and red grapes are common in the United States.

  Winemakers use fermented grapes to make wine. California, Washington, and Oregon are the largest producers (makers) of wine in the United States.

A strawberry – strawberries

*Blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are fruits that Americans call berries.

A tangerine – tangerines

*The inside of a tangerine is divided into “segments.” A tangerine is a type of citrus fruit.

A watermelon – watermelons

The “rind” is the thick outside layer of a watermelon. Cantaloupes, honeydews, and watermelons are some types of melons.

Plural Names of Vegetables

Singular - One Vegetable

Plural - Two Vegetables

An artichoke – artichokes

*The thick scales on the outside of an artichoke are called “leaves.” To prepare an artichoke for cooking, you cut off the stem. Then you cut off the thorns from the leaves. You cut off the top (also called the “crown”) and pull off the leaves. If you want to remove the “artichoke heart,” you remove the “choke” that is above the artichoke heart. The artichoke heart is the favorite part of the artichoke for chefs in restaurants because it is tender. Americans eat both the inner leaves and the artichoke heart.

Asparagus/ asparagus spear/ asparagus stalk – asparagus/ asparagus spears/ asparagus stalks

*The word “asparagus” is an uncountable noun in the United States. “An asparagus” and “one asparagus” is not used. Instead say “asparagus”/ “one asparagus spear”/ “one asparagus stalk.” Plural: “Asparagus”/ “two asparagus spears”/ “two asparagus stalks.”

Example #1: I ate asparagus last night.

Example #2: I ate two asparagus spears last night.

Example #3: There are artichokes, asparagus, and peas on the table.

Rarely you may see the plural of asparagus as asparaguses or asparagi. 

A “bunch of asparagus” or a “bundle of asparagus” is a lot of asparagus connected together, often with rubber bands.

A bean – beans

*Beans belong to the legume family.

Common beans found in supermarkets in the United States include kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, black-eyed peas, lima beans, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), great northern beans, navy beans, pink beans, and small red beans.

The USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) lists beans as both proteins and vegetables.

A bell pepper – bell peppers

*A bell pepper is cut into slices.

Bell peppers are also called “sweet peppers” in the United States. Bell peppers do not have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste. 

Common colors of bell peppers in the United States are green, red, orange, and yellow.

Bok choy – bok choy

*Bok choy is an uncountable noun in the United States. “A bok choy”/ “one bok choy”/ “two bok choy” is not used.  Use “bok choy” for both singular and plural nouns.

Example: I ate bok choy last night.

Bok choy is also called “Chinese cabbage” in the United States.

Broccoli/ a head of broccoli – broccoli/ heads of broccoli

*Broccoli is an uncountable noun in the United States. “A broccoli”/ “one broccoli”/ “two broccoli” is not used. Instead use “broccoli” or “head(s) of broccoli” for both singular and plural.

Example #1: I ate broccoli last night.

Example #2: I ate a head of broccoli last night.

Example #3: We grew broccoli, potatoes, and carrots in our garden.

“Broccoli florets” are the small flowering pieces that together make a larger head of broccoli.

A brussels sprout/ a brussel sprout – brussels sprouts/ brussel sprouts

The words “brussels sprout” and plural: “brussels sprouts” are more common in the United States.

Brussels sprouts are small cabbages. 

Cabbage/ a cabbage/ a head of cabbage – cabbage/ cabbages/ heads of cabbage

The word “cabbage” is both an uncountable and countable noun in the United States. 

The uncountable form of “cabbage” is often used when you are talking about eating part of a whole cabbage. The uncountable form of “cabbage” is also used when you are talking about cabbage in a general way.

Example #1: I ate cabbage last night.

Example #2: Cabbage is a delicious vegetable.

Example #3: It is easy to grow cabbage in a pot.

The countable form of “cabbage” is used too, when you are talking about a whole cabbage.

Example #1: I grew six cabbages in my garden.

Example #2: Pick a cabbage that feels heavy.

Example #3: I bought three cabbages at the store.

“Head(s) of cabbage” is also used as a countable noun.

 A “head of cabbage” is one whole round cabbage.

Example #1: I bought five heads of cabbage at the store.

Example #2: I grew two heads of cabbage in my garden.

Some types of cabbage are green cabbage, red cabbage, Chinese cabbage, Savoy cabbage, brussels sprouts, and kohlrabi.

Many leaves together form a head of cabbage. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

A carrot – carrots
 
*A carrot is cut into slices. The green leaves on the top of a carrot are called a “carrot top” or “carrot greens” in the United States.
 
A “bunch of carrots” is a group of carrots connected together. “Baby carrots” are small carrots.
 
A carrot is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

Cauliflower/ a cauliflower/ a head of cauliflower- cauliflower/ cauliflowers/ heads of cauliflower

Cauliflower is used as both an uncountable and countable noun in the United States.  The uncountable noun is more common in the United States.

Uncountable example #1: Plan to grow cauliflower in cool weather.

Uncountable example #2: Microwave the potatoes and cauliflower in water.

Countable example #1: Why are my cauliflowers wilting?

“Head(s) of cauliflower” is also used as a countable noun.

 A “head of cauliflower” is one whole cauliflower vegetable.

Example #1: Take one medium head of cauliflower and cut it into quarters.

Example #2: To boil a whole head of cauliflower, remove the leaves and put the entire cauliflower in your pot.

Cauliflower florets are small flowering pieces of cauliflower. Together cauliflower florets make a larger head of cauliflower.

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.

Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.

Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.

Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.


Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.


Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.


Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.


The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.


In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”


Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.


Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.


Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.

Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.

Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.

Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.

In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”

Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.

Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.

Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.
*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.

Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.

Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.

Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.

Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.

In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”

Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.

Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.

Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.

Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.


Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.


Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.


Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.


The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.


In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”


Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.


Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.


Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”

Celery/ a celery stalk/ a bunch of celery- celery/ celery stalks/ bunches of celery

*”Celery” is an uncountable noun in normal use in the United States. “A celery”/ “one celery”/ “two celery” is not used.


Instead, use “celery,” “bunch(es) of celery,” “bundle(s) of celery,” “celery stalk(s),” “celery rib(s),”or “celery stick(s)” for both singular and plural nouns. Bunches and bundles of celery, celery stalks, and celery sticks are countable nouns.


Uncountable example #1: I am growing celery in my garden.

Uncountable example #2: Enjoy celery raw.


Uncountable example #3: Use the bags to squeeze the cream cheese on the celery.


The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls a whole celery vegetable a “stalk,” and one long separate piece of celery a “branch.” However, what the USDA calls a “stalk,” Americans generally use the words “bunch” or “bundle” in everyday use.  Americans use the words “stalk” or “rib” to describe one long separate piece of celery.

If you are following a recipe that calls for two stalks or ribs of celery, that will usually mean two long separate pieces of celery. Sometimes American chefs will describe a celery “bunch” as a “stalk.”  If you are confused, I understand.


In one bunch or bundle of celery are many long celery stalks or ribs. If these stalks are cut into pieces, they are called celery sticks.  The root of the celery is called “celeriac.”


Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.


Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.


Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.

Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.

Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

“celeriac.”

Example #1: Cut off the top leaves and the base from one bunch of celery.

Example #2: Separate the celery stalks from one another.

Example #3: Cut the celery into sticks.

A chili pepper – chili peppers

*Chili peppers have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste.

Chili peppers are called “chilies,” “chile peppers,” and “hot peppers” in the United States.

 Chili peppers are cut into slices.

In the scientific definition, chili peppers are berries. But most Americans think of chili peppers as vegetables.

Chinese cabbage/ a Chinese cabbage/ head of Chinese cabbage – Chinese cabbage/ Chinese cabbages/ heads of Chinese cabbage

*There are two kinds of Chinese cabbage.  One type of Chinese cabbage is called “napa cabbage.”   It is also called “Chinese cabbage” in the United States. The second type of Chinese cabbage is called “bok choy.”

Go to “CABBAGE” above to learn about the singular and plural forms of cabbage.

Many leaves together form a head of Chinese cabbage. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

Corn/ a corn cob – corn/ cobs of corn

*Corn is an uncountable noun. “A/one/two corn” is not used. Instead use “corn” or “corn cob(s)” for both singular and plural.

Example: I ate 2 corn cobs last night. Kernels are the small square pieces of corn that together form a corn cob.

A cucumber – cucumbers

*A cucumber is cut into slices. Cucumbers grow on a vine.

In the scientific definition, cucumbers are berries. But most Americans think of cucumbers as vegetables.

A daikon/ a daikon radish- daikons/ daikon radishes

*A daikon is a type of radish. A daikon is cut into slices.

A daikon is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

Eggplant/ an eggplant – eggplant/ eggplants

*An eggplant is cut into slices. In the scientific definition, eggplants are berries. But most Americans think of eggplants as vegetables. The plant was named an eggplant because the fruits of an eggplant look like a chicken’s eggs.

Eggplant is both a countable and uncountable noun in the United States. The plural form of eggplant is eggplants and eggplant. Eggplants is used when talking about the whole vegetable. Use eggplant in the plural form when talking about eating part of an eggplant.

Garlic/ a garlic bulb – garlic/garlic bulbs

*”Garlic” is both countable and uncountable. It is more common for “garlic” to be used as uncountable. Example: Your breath smells like garlic. Rarely you will hear the word “garlics.” Garlic bulb is the large form of garlic. Many garlic cloves form one garlic bulb.

A green bean – green beans

*“Green beans” are also called “French beans,” “snap beans,” or the French name “haricot vert” in the United States. Many years ago, green beans had the name “string beans” because they all had a string inside them. People would remove the strings before eating or cut them into pieces to swallow them.

Today, green beans in U.S. supermarkets usually are a modern type with no string. But some Americans still grow “string beans.”

In the northern United States, a popular dish Americans eat around the holidays is green bean casserole. It is a popular dish because it is easy to make. There are only four ingredients in the classic recipe: cream of mushroom soup, green beans, milk, and French-fried onions. Today, Americans add their favorite ingredients to make this recipe new again!

A green bell pepper – green bell peppers

*A green bell pepper is cut into slices. Bell peppers are also called “sweet peppers” in the United States. Bell peppers do not have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste.

In the scientific definition, bell peppers are berries. But most Americans think of bell peppers as vegetables.

Green cabbage/ a green cabbage/ head of green cabbage – green cabbage/ green cabbages/ heads of green cabbage

*Go to “CABBAGE” above to learn about the singular and plural forms of cabbage.

Green cabbage is a type of cabbage. Many leaves together form a head of green cabbage. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

Did you know…the heaviest green cabbage was grown by Scott A. Robb from Palmer, Alaska? It weighed 138 pounds (62.17 kg)! That’s a heavy cabbage!

Kohlrabi/ a kohlrabi – kohlrabi/ kohlrabis/ kohlrabies

*The word “kohlrabi” is both an uncountable and countable noun in the United States. 

Singular form: Use the uncountable form (kohlrabi) or countable form (a kohlrabi/ one kohlrabi) of the noun. 

Plural form: Use the uncountable form (kohlrabi) or countable form (kohlrabis/ kohlrabies) of the noun.

The uncountable form of “kohlrabi” is often used when:

  1. You are talking about eating part of a whole kohlrabi vegetable.
  2. You are talking about kohlrabi in a general way.
  3. You are talking about more than one kohlrabi.

Example #1: I ate kohlrabi last night.

Example #2: Learn how to select and store kohlrabi so you can add this to your next meal.

Example #3: Look for kohlrabi when it is in season.

Example #4: Select a variety of kohlrabi.

You can use the countable form of “kohlrabi” when you are talking about one or more whole kohlrabi vegetables.

“Kohlrabis” is more popular than “kohlrabies” for the countable plural form in the United States.

Example #1: Place the kohlrabis on the coals.

Example #2: Separate kohlrabies from each other.

Example #3: Take one kohlrabi.

Kohlrabi is a type of cabbage. Kohlrabi is also called a German turnip.  It has a stem that is in the shape of a turnip.

Kohlrabi is sweeter than broccoli and other cabbages.

Kohlrabi is popular in states that have larger German populations, such as Wisconsin.  You can eat the stem, the bulb, and the leaves of the plant.

A leek – leeks

Leeks are related to onions and garlic. The leek tastes like an onion. The leek has long, green leaves. The white base of the leek is above the roots.

Americans eat the white part of the leek and the light green parts. Some use the dark green parts of the leaves and the roots to make vegetable stock.

Lettuce/ a head of lettuce- lettuce/ lettuces/ heads of lettuce 

In the United States, there are four main groups of lettuce: butterhead, crisphead, leaf, and romaine. There are many kinds of lettuce within each group.
 
Butterhead, crisphead, and romaine lettuce are called “head lettuce.” These are the round types of lettuce. The types of lettuce that grow a bunch of separate leaves are called “leaf lettuce.”
 

Many leaves together form a head of lettuce. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

In the United States, lettuce is a common ingredient in a salad, hamburger, taco, and sandwich.

The word “lettuce” is an uncountable and countable noun in the United States.

 Singular form: Use “lettuce” as the uncountable form of the noun. You can also use the countable form “head of lettuce” for the singular form, or “lettuce leaf.”

Plural form: The uncountable noun “lettuce” is the most commonly used in the United States.  The countable form “lettuces” is sometimes used.  You can also use “lettuce leaves.”

The uncountable form of “lettuce” is often used when:

  1. You are talking about eating part of a whole lettuce.
  2. You are talking about lettuce in a general way.
  3. You are talking about more than one whole lettuce.

Example #1: I ate lettuce last night.

Example #2: It is a good idea to always wash lettuce.

Example #3: Grow your lettuce in room temperature conditions.

The countable form of “lettuce” is used too, when you are talking about different kinds of lettuce.  You can also talk about a “lettuce leaf” or “lettuce leaves.”

Example #1: Butter lettuces include Boston and bibb varieties.

Example #2: Remove and rinse each lettuce leaf under cold water.

“Head(s) of lettuce” is also used as a countable noun.  This is only used for the round types of lettuce.

 A “head of lettuce” is one whole round lettuce.

Example #1: Hold the head of lettuce in two hands.

Example #2: Cut the head of lettuce in half.

A potato – potatoes

*A potato is cut into slices.   Did you know?  More than 200 kinds of potatoes are sold in the United States. That is a lot of potatoes! A potato is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.  Potato chips and french fries are popular snacks for Americans.  A popular potato recipe is mashed potatoes.

An onion – onions

*An onion is cut into slices. An onion is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

The cut rings of an onion, when covered with egg, milk, and flour and cooked in oil, are called “onion rings.” “Onion rings” are common in fast-food restaurants in the United States.

A pea – peas

*Peas are seeds that grow in pea pods. In the scientific definition, pea pods are fruits. But most Americans think of peas and pea pods as vegetables.

A pepper – peppers

*Peppers include “chili peppers” and “bell peppers” in the United States. Chili peppers have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste.

Chili peppers are called “chilies,” “chile peppers,” and “hot peppers” in the United States. Bell peppers are often called “sweet peppers” in the United States.

Bell peppers do not have capsaicin, so they are sweeter than hot peppers. Chili peppers and bell peppers are cut into slices.

In the scientific definition, peppers are berries. But most Americans think of peppers as vegetables.

A potato – potatoes

*A potato is cut into slices.  Did you know? More than 200 kinds of potatoes are sold in the United States. That is a lot of potatoes!

A potato is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

  Potato chips and french fries are popular snacks for Americans. A popular potato recipe is mashed potatoes.

A pumpkin – pumpkins

*Pumpkins are a type of winter squash. In the scientific definition, squashes are berries.  But most Americans think of squashes as vegetables.

In the United States, pumpkins are carved and become jack-o’-lanterns! Americans place a candle inside a jack-o’-lantern to celebrate Halloween.

A radish – radishes

*A radish is cut into slices. A radish is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

A red bell pepper – red bell peppers

*A red bell pepper is cut into slices. Bell peppers are also called “sweet peppers” in the United States. Bell peppers do not have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste.

In the scientific definition, bell peppers are berries. But most Americans think of bell peppers as vegetables.

Red cabbage/ a red cabbage/ head of red cabbage – red cabbage/ red cabbages/ heads of red cabbage

*Go to “CABBAGE” above to learn about the singular and plural forms of cabbage.

Red cabbage is a type of cabbage. Red cabbage is also called “purple cabbage.”

Many leaves together form a head of red cabbage. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

Savoy cabbage/ a Savoy cabbage/ head of Savoy cabbage – Savoy cabbage/ Savoy cabbages/ heads of Savoy cabbage

*Go to “CABBAGE” above to learn about the singular and plural forms of cabbage.

Savoy cabbage is a type of cabbage. The leaves of the Savoy cabbage are crinkled and look like a brain. Compared to the Savoy cabbage, a green cabbage has leaves that are smoother in texture.

Many leaves together form a head of Savoy cabbage. The singular form of leaves is “leaf.”

Spinach/ spinach leaf- spinach/ spinach leaves

A squash – squashes

* There are many kinds of summer and winter squashes. Pumpkins are a kind of winter squash. Zucchini are a type of summer squash.

In the scientific definition, squashes are berries. But most Americans think of squashes as vegetables.

A tomato – tomatoes

*A tomato is cut into slices. In the scientific definition, tomatoes are a type of fruit. But many Americans think of tomatoes as vegetables.

A yam – yams

*A yam is cut into slices. A yam is similar to a sweet potato. Some Americans call yams “sweet potatoes,” but they are different vegetables.

A yam is named a “root vegetable” because the part you eat grows under the ground.

A yellow bell pepper – yellow bell peppers

*A yellow bell pepper is cut into slices. Bell peppers are also called “sweet peppers” in the United States. Bell peppers do not have capsaicin, a chemical that gives chili peppers their spicy taste.

In the scientific definition, bell peppers are berries. But most Americans think of bell peppers as vegetables.

A zucchini- zucchinis

*A zucchini is cut into slices. Zucchini are a type of summer squash. In the scientific definition, squashes are berries.  But most Americans think of squashes as vegetables.

Zucchini is a noncountable and countable noun. The plural of zucchini is zucchini or zucchinis.

Wow- that was a big list!

Now let's practice using some of our new vocabulary!

Let's practice!

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